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January 18, 2018, 09:44:53 PM

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core in the news (2013)  (Read 3267 times)

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Neil
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I don't know if this bill will get passed but it would restore the Core's ability to contract with non- profits to collect fees at some core sites and reinvest the fees in improvements in the facilities. Shutting down this program because the fees had to go to the general fund instead of being reinvest in the sites by non-profits may be the reason for Avalon and Tickey Creek being shut down.

From Dallas Morning News "A federal decision has left three North Texas parks closed, 15 more in jeopardy and hundreds of park workers out of a job." Apparently Non-profits were able to work at Lake Lewisville to clean up after the last time it flooded, before a judge decided this use of gate fees was not legal. What will they do this time.

H.R.4100 & S.2055 are both in committees.

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/cpquery/?&dbname=cp113&sid=cp113BXnTS&refer=&r_n=sr309.113&item=&&&sel=TOC_4336&



Last Edit: May 22, 2015, 12:32:23 PM by NLester

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Neil
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That's probably why the roads at East Fork Park are in such terrible condition. East Fork was one of the parks operated under the private companies. Fees were increased at many parks shortly before the private firm contract's were cancelled and all the increased fees have just gone into the black hole of big guv. No money has been spent on the parks. It's ironic that East Fork park has been allowed to decline to its present condition as it is the only park on Lake Lavon with 50 amp service at the campsites. Maybe if the COE can get this passed, some repair and upgrade money will start flowing back into the parks. If not...all the fees are nuthing but another veiled tax by big guv.  icon_rolleyes I can easily see how the present system really puts the COE at a disadvantage at maintaining any parks.  icon_eek




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Interesting article. I had not realized that Ray Hubbard was a water supply reservoir only and not a flood reduction lake.

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/metro/20150526-flood-control-effort-in-dallas-area-a-daunting-task.ece

It looks like Robertson Park on Lake Ray Hubbard is now in the hands of the developers.
http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2015/03/17/despite-park-shortage-city-of-dallas-sold-one-of-its-largest-parks/



Last Edit: May 27, 2015, 05:39:32 PM by NLester

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So is the Dallas news right or the Texas Development Board?   Lake Hubbard has gates, it has a flood control function but it does not seem to have much reserved for storage, so it's flood control functions are probably limited and flood control would not be a primary function.

https://www.twdb.texas.gov/surfacewater/rivers/reservoirs/ray_hubbard/index.asp

We went out on Lake Tawakoni yesterday. The water  was stained and covered with lots of twigs. We caught a mixture of small Sandies, Hybrids and one stripper and not many of those. I had not thought of the fact that Tawakoni is impounded with a concrete spillway and no gates. The entire lake is about a half a foot higher than the top of the spillway.

It is like a giant infinity pool when you look across the water. For awhile, it' level should be fairly constant, unless it comes a flood.



Last Edit: May 28, 2015, 09:00:09 AM by NLester

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Officials from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it will take about 90 days for lake levels to return to normal.

Boat ramps and swimming areas could remain closed for much of the summer, a corps official said.

“We’d love to have recreation available for the Fourth of July, but it’s very doubtful,” Col. R.J. Muraski said.

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/community-news/dallas/headlines/20150608-dallas-county-damage-exceeds-61-million-after-mays-extreme-rainfall-floods.ece



Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 12:29:25 AM by NLester

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Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 03:03:45 PM by NLester

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Some ramps are open on Lavon??? Which ones?




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Some ramps are open on Lavon??? Which ones?

You caught that did you. I am assuming they are impelying they may open in Aug. I am happy they are releasing information but I am not certain what that information is.




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Neil
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Since Lavon is still 11' high and dropping less than an inch a day, I doubt that the ramps will be open anytime soon.  Especially given all the repair work that will have to be done since the ramps and roads have been underwater so long.  Maybe by Labor Day.



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From Wikipedia Texas State Highway 78.

in 1990 SH 78 was flooded, as engineers at the Lake Lavon Dam decided to release the water from the lake into the East Fork of the Trinity River. For a month and a half, the traffic going between Wylie and the Eastern portion of Collin County was diverted to go through the city of Rockwall, a nearly 20-mile (32 km) detour. The railroad that ran adjacent to the highway was completely washed out, and significant shoulder damage was done to the highway.]
In 1990 SH 78 was flooded, as engineers at the Lake Lavon Dam decided to release the water from the lake into the East Fork of the Trinity River. For a month and a half, the traffic going between Wylie and the Eastern portion of Collin County was diverted to go through the city of Rockwall, a nearly 20-mile (32 km) detour. The railroad that ran adjacent to the highway was completely washed out, and significant shoulder damage was done to the highway.

Does anyone remember this happening??  I can barely remember the news reports about how Dallas was impacted.



Last Edit: July 01, 2015, 12:14:08 AM by NLester

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Record floods 1990

At the Fort Worth District, the Corps staff maintained an around-the-clock duty schedule from April 26 through May 5. The District receives rainfall data from 126 remote gauge locations via satellite. The data are downloaded to the computer center in Fort Worth and transmitted to the District control center every hour. Engineers receive additional data from radar storm imaging, the NWS and their own operations personnel at the reservoir sites.
Data were assembled by computer models to a Decision Support System (DSS) data base, presenting information in graphic and tabular form. This information is used to set project discharge rates and "route" the flows to a target gauge location downstream. The whole process is conducted within a set of operating rules for the projects which are structured to meet the project operating objectives. NWS/RFC forecasts can then predict the results.

The Trinity River had crested in the rnetro-plex by May 4. It would take about two weeks for the surge to traverse the 200 river miles to Lake Livingston through the rural Texas countryside. In some places, reports said the river was 10 miles wide. While rain continued to fall in parts of the upper basin, lateral inflows were slight. The floodplain residents in the lower basin under clear skies could only watch and wait. Thus the hydrologic concept of the routed flood is depicted.

Later land owners down stream from Lake Livingston sued and won a judgement because they claimed the dam at Lake Livingston increased flood levels above previous historic high levels. Lake Livingston  is a water supply lake for Houston without flood control capacities, so what ever happens above it is passed downstream.



Last Edit: July 01, 2015, 12:17:34 AM by NLester

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