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April 24, 2018, 11:00:21 AM

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New Boat Advice  (Read 2065 times)
Lunker Extreme
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Posts: 220


Ok all, I am about to get in the market for a new boat. I am replacing a 24 foot Berkshire Limited Tritoon Fish and Ski boat. I am thinking that I want to get an aluminum fish and ski combo with 150hp or bigger. I see that there are a few options from Alumacraft, Lund and Lowe along with a few others, Crestliner I think. At any rate I am wondering what advice many of you have regarding these.

I really don't think I want a deck boat like the Lowe version or anything with a raised platform. My concern is that something will go flying off the boat. So I was thinking something like a deep v version. As often as I am fishing in the tree area and hitting limbs and such I am thinking that aluminum will be better than fiberglass.

Can you please share your thoughts on the pros and cons of getting aluminum or fiberglass. Thoughts on a deep v or some other type? Is one better than another for the shallow water fishing?

I mostly fish for cats and crappie. I am definitely not a bass angler. I plan to install my current Terrova and Humminbird ONIX on it. As you all know boat prices are outrageous these days so I am trying to research as much as I can. I think that the best advice typically comes from this forum.

Thanks in advance for the advice and making me feel welcome here the last few years!



Last Edit: February 27, 2015, 09:22:09 PM by Cats-N-Craps

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John

I have come to the conclusion that I know everything about nothing and nothing about everything
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LLF Fishing Addict
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Posts: 6272


For aluminum deep vee I think the best is Lund, followed by Crestliner. Lowe, Alumacraft, G3 etc are a distant third IMHO. I own a Lowe and would not buy another one. The quality is just not what it used to be for their boats. I would also not own a tracker but lots of them around. Poor construction with lots of weld crack problems.

Another option is Seaark. Heavy construction primarily for kitty fishin but certainly could be used for crappie. Look at some of the fishin forums from the northern states where they do walleye fishin and see what they use. Primarily Lund cause they can go fairly shallow and can handle bad water when it is needed.




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Lunker Extreme
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Posts: 220


Thanks DavidP for the advice. My main corporate office is in MN so I will send a note to several of the folks I work with up there and get there advice as well. I hadn't thought about that but greatly appreciate the advice!!!




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John

I have come to the conclusion that I know everything about nothing and nothing about everything
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Lunker Extreme
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Posts: 931


Based on my experience with an aluminum tracker deckboat, I would not buy another aluminum boat. I took mine in the sticks traveling slowly thru the stumps and then hit a submerged stump that put a dent in the aluminum. I have hit stumps before in a fiberglass without this kind of damage.
I don't know if fiberglass is stronger than aluminun, but I prefer a fiberglass. Maybe I'm just biased. It seems to me that fiberglass damage would be easier to repair. But I do not know that for a fact. Just my thoughts on the topic.




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You gotta go fishin if you wanna catch some fish....
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LLF Fishing Legend
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Posts: 1677


Well,I have a little of both...My pontoon barge has fiberglass outer pontoons and an aluminum center pontoon. I've had to patch two holes in the fiberglass,and I have several dents in the aluminum...Take your pick,Nothing is immune to stump damage!



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LLF Fishing Addict
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Posts: 7390


Good luck with getting a definitive answer!  lol

Truth is that both fiber boats and aluminum can be considerd tough.  The manufacturer also comes into play.  Some of each type are not designed for abuse and some are.

I would have easily said that fiberglass repair is very expensive and aluminum could be an easy fix.  Just depends on what happenned.  The idea is that the aluminum boats will bend and not break.  We have watched many boats come and go on the forum and you will find many options on them.

I think I have learned that there is no perfect example.  Just have to fish with folks and try out different options and see what you like and where they fish. 

I have always enjoyed using my gear, so every dent, ding, scratch, and broken component has a story to tell.  icon_smile 

I fish out of an aluminum Lund that has been through heck and back.  Still doesnt leak.  Ain't perfect though.  Been parked on rocks and places you really should avoid.




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Joe Simpson
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LLF Fishing Legend
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Posts: 2974

T-wok 30#


+1 Joe. I for 1 can say fiberglass is tough. Depends on what you want. Not sure what my next one will be myself Im researching and raising bucks lol. My old falcon was a very tough boat just cost a mint to run. For economy I would recommend staying with either a 4 cylinder or 4 stroke.




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Cooncrazy1

A little slime never hurt anyone.
Alot is even better
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