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August 17, 2018, 11:13:54 PM

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any reloaders out there?  (Read 4762 times)
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I've been toying with the idea of reloading....anyone do this?



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That's all we did growing up was reload our own shotgun shells and rifle cartridges.  Lots of fun that was...  DavidP still has the presses set up in the garage, they've just been out of commision for a while now.




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Shawn, whut you wanna know? I been reloading for 43 years, rifle, pistol & shotgun. I can most likely answer your questions. I can tell you that you can purchase 12 0r 20 ga standard lead shotshells for just about the cost of reloading.

Rifle & pitol cartridges & .410 gauge, 28 ga or 16 ga shotshells are cost effective to reload. I'm lookin for some 375 Winchester reloading stuff now. Anybody got anything they want to part with? At $40 to $60 a box of 20 cartridges, when they can be found, the 375 win is definitely a reloaders cartridge!




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I am wanting to start reloading 9mm.  Just some range plinking ammo.   Stuff has gotten so expensive and isn't easy to find.  i want to be able to go to the range once a week or once every 2 weeks.  Having to pay $30-$40 in ammo plus range fee is getting a little steep.

I've watched a bunch of videos on the internet and read a lot about it but haven't done any.

How hard is it?  From what i can tell if you recylce your own brass it seems like you can make it for about half the price of factory ammo, is that true?

is a single stage press OK...been looking at the Lee's anniversary kit at cabela's for around $100.  The dies are an extra $25 or so..what else would I need?

one thing that seems that would slow a person down is weighing the powder on each one.  I've seen that auto measure deals, are they worth it.

Any info for a newbie would be helpful.



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You will want a powder measure and you most definitely will need a good powder scale scale. Don't scrimp on the scale. Weighing each charge is OK for small production but if you are going to be loading a bunch of 9mm for plincking you will get tired of weighing each charge real fast. Once a good powder measure is set it will thro plenty accurate charges for plinking.

If you are going to weigh each charge then you will need a powder trickler also. This will trickle powder onto the scale in much smaller amounts than you can shake onto the scale. Remember you will be dealing with grains as a unit of weight measure and 7000 grains equal a pound!

I have always been partial to the RCBS equipment but have used some of the LEE equipment too! You will also want an auto primer on your press or get the LEE hand primer tool. This will make priming cases much faster. FYI, so you do not need lubricant on re-sizing the brass I would recommend carbide dies too! They cost more but will greatly cut down on case lube and case cleaning chores. Standard dies will require a lube pad and cases will need to be lubed prior to resizing.

Eventually you will also need a case trimmer unless you buy more brass sooner. BUt 9mm brass is cheap and plentiful and most likely will not need trimming...just get some more brass. You will need a trimmer if you get into reloading rifle cartridges. Operating pressures can be much higher.

The reloading process itself is easy. Its getting the cases prepared to load that is the work. You may want to invest in a case tumbler for cleaning too. The wish list will go on an on. Reloading is neat but if your only gonna shoot a few boxes a month you might want to re-consider. If you want something to keep you busy and then allow you to shoot the fruits of yer hobby then re-loading is a lot of fun. Plus you can customize loads that will perform better in your particular weapon. Just depends on what you want out of the hobby.

For years I reloaded a nosler ballistic tip bullet for my .270 and got extremely accurate loads for this rifle with ammo that outperformed factory ammo. You could only get the ballistic tip by reloading. NOw Fedearl offers this bullet in factory loads but at lower velocity than I can get hand loading.

C




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cool thanks for the info.   Back in the day of $4-$5 blazer ammo, I'd go through about 250 rounds in an outing.  If I took my 9mm carbine, you could double that number.  I think realistically I could see myself shooting 250 rounds per outing every 2 weeks... so 10 boxes a month.

Now I just gotta figure if i wanna start.

Where did you buy your components.. powder, primers, bullets etc etc.



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Bass Pro if you are buying local. Gander Mountain & cabelas. Cheaper than Dirt for ammo. Used to be lots of places to get reloading supplies but fire marshalls have really clamped down on areas that are allowed to sell components due to the explosive nature of some supplies. The internet has seveal large reloading suppliers, Midway come to mind. Just do a search and compare prices.




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well I finally did it.  Ordered a tumbler from Harbor Freight 2 weeks ago.

Just ordered a Lee Turret press Kit from Cabela's and a 9mm die set.

Now I gotta figure out what to tell the wifey when she see's it hit the account.  I have a sneaky suspicion this is gonna cost me a high dollar purse purchase as pay back!



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Well reloading is kinda like tying jigs. Ya got to hurry up and lose em so ya can tie some mo! Cartridges ain't no different!  Reload .....Shoot mo....reload mo....shoot mo..... icon_lol All the while buying mo stuff and components. Then ya get a new die set for different calibre.....kinda like new jig mold. And the process starts over!  icon_biggrin

Welcome to the club!!!




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I am a big fan of the Lee dies with the factory crimp,  Always enjoyed loading when I was a in Montana and had plenty of places to shoot and hunt for free.  300 Win Mag, 7,62x 39 SKS, 45 acp, and 12 ga.



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Here is a great forum for reloading.  http://handloads.com/ .  In 1983 I specifically bought a Thompson contender in 7 mm TCU just so I would have to learn to reload as there was no factory loads for this gun.  I took cheap military .223 brass and necked it out to 7 mm and then you have to fire form the brass with a light load and a cotton plug to form the square shoulders then you load it.  For a pistol round that shoots at up to 2100 fps it is a real thunder thumper.  I have a C&H double post press with 4 stations.  Your sizing die that also is used to pop the primer out requires the most pressure and should always be placed in the center station either directly in front of the post (single post) or in the middle between the posts because this is the strongest part of the press and you won't be applying torque to your press as the force is applied.  Get a primer pocket reamer to clean the primer pocket and remove the crimp that is present in military brass.  Use dry graphite to lube the inside of the neck so you don't contaminate the powder with any kind of petroleum based greases. You'll learn to feel the primer seat, it is a little tricky at first, always examine the seating to make sure the primer is flush with the base - too deep will misfire, too high and you will have jams.  The best way to learn how deep to seat the bullet is to read up on head space (the gap between the end of the bullet shoulder and the rifling in the barrel.  I start out by pushing the bullet in and then put it in the chamber to see how far it goes in before hitting the riflings.  I gradually seat the bullet deeper and deeper until I can get the bullet all the way in but still feel contact.  You then seat the die a little deeper by about a 1/4 to 1/2 turn and then lock the die ring with an allen wrench and you are set to go.  By experimenting with the bullet head space you can either squeeze a little more velocity out or a little more accuracy. Always start out a new load about 10% below the recommended load and fire a few rounds and examine the primer.  If the edges start to flatten out then you are getting too much pressure which can be very dangerous.  Always use a manual to find loading data for your particular bullet weight and type of gun and always start there before you try experimenting.  If someone tells you about a new load that is THE one always back off 10% and work up to the load - the same goes for factory manuals.  More powder doesn't always mean more power or accuracy.  In some cases the loading data actually calls for compressing the powder.  Barrel length is also critical to loading performance because pistol powders burn very rapidly and rifle powders burn relatively slower.  A slow burning powder in a short barrel performs lousy because the powder hasn't even burned all the way before the bullet leaves the barrel.  A very loud report is often an indicator this is happening.  Make sure your pistol is rated for hot loads.  You can really screw up a pistol rather quickly with hot loads as the springs in autos may not handle the recoil and wheel guns may have thin cylinder walls and cannot safely fire a magnum type load.  For home defense a slower bullet may be a lot safer as it won't penetrate 6 walls before stopping.  I used to load a .357 semi-jacketed hollow point by using a pocket reamer to ream out the hollow point and drop in a few grains of bulls-eye powder and seat a primer in it.  If it hit a wall it would explode and not go through the walls.  If it hit an intruder you'd have to call Dalworth carpet cleaners.  One last safety tip. Auto powder measurers which i use in order to speed up reloading need to be checked every ten or so loads to make sure the loads are accurate.  Don't fill the powder hopper all the way up as this will compress the load and be too hot.  Stick a bullet case up and throw a load of powder then pour the load into the scale to check it.  When you first set the hopper throw about 10-15 loads and weigh each one to see if they are accurate.  I took a piece of aluminum and cut it in a circle and then cut a couple of small notches (1/2 inch wide and 1/4" deep) and folded it into a V then shoved it down the barrel of the powder hopper until it was about an inch from the bottom so the powder would have to flow slowly around the plug like an hour glass so the powder doesn't compact.  You can also load a little shy then use the trickler to finish out the load on a scale which saves time and is very accurate.  I also only try to never touch the base of teh bullets while loading to I don't get contaminants inside the case.  I have bullets I loaded 30 years ago that still fire everytime.  Now we need to figure out what loads to use for catfish. icon_lol




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thanks for the tip!  I got my press set up and all the equipment.  Now if I could just find some small pistol primers.  I have some on back order but its gonna be a while.  Went to 3 different gun shops today and nuttin'.  Just gotta be patient I guess.



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anyone know were to get some .38 hollows? friend is looking for a few box's says there are hard to find. how about some reloads?




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southwest ammunition is a pretty good source for stuff.  They are in mesquite.  they have very limited business hours so make sure you check before you go.  They don't have a website or nuttin'.  they are pretty small.

I haven't looked for .38 but they have a bunch of stuff.   GunMasters in East Plano has some stuff too.

I just ordered some lead bullets from missouri bullets and got them fast!  Precision Delta is supposed to be good as well, but they have a long wait time.



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